Tag «salmon»

Save Craigflower Creek: Updates

Update: On March 4, Angela Hanes was interviewed regarding this issue by host Adam Stirling on CFAX radio. You may listen to the recorded interview here.

The intrepid Angela Hanes provided us with news regarding the Save Craigflower Creek petition campaign, a grassroots response to BC Transit’s plan to develop a vehicle maintenance facility on land that spans the salmon-bearing Craigflower Creek.

The Black Press published an article on this topic. Angela was misquoted a few times, in one case attributing Angela with starting the petition that in fact was started by her neighbour.

West Coast Environmental Law has suggested the group apply to them for funding and referred them to a lawyer. The application is under way! To defray funding for legal and other costs associated with the campaign, a GoFundMe page has been created. Please consider a donation to this cause.

For those who’ve not yet signed and shared the petition, here it is.

Release of Draft 2020/21 BC Salmon IFMPs for Consultation

DFO has released the 2020-21 draft Northern and Southern BC Salmon Integrated Fishery Management Plans (IFMPs) for comment.

The deadline for submission of comments is April 15, 2020.

From Fisheries Notice FN0164:

The draft IFMPs set out the policy framework that guides decision making, general objectives relating to management of stocks of concern, enhancement and enforcement, as well as decision guidelines for a range of fisheries.

Section 13 of the IFMPs outline the Species Specific Fishing Plans, which describe fisheries plans for each of the salmon species and the management units and major fishery areas for each species. This section includes the relevant information on management approach, decision guidelines and specific management measures, as well as, information related to First Nations, commercial and recreational fishing plans for each fishery.

During March and April, the Department will be meeting with First Nations and recreational, commercial and environmental groups to seek further feedback on the draft IFMPs as part of the IFMP consultation process.

Comments may be provided in writing via email to the DFO Pacific Salmon Management Team at DFO.PacificSalmonRMT-EGRSaumonduPacifique.MPO@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

2020-2021 IFMP Process and Deadline for Input

The 2020-2021 IFMP Timeline document from DFO sets out the dates and opportunities for comment regarding the IFMP.  Of particular interest, the deadline for input on the IFMP Planning Priorities is January 13, 2020.

An IFMP is an integrated fisheries management plan that DFO develops for each fishery to describe the fishery and its management issues, and then sets out how that fishery will be managed.  The IFMP priorities and the final plan set the stage for which fisheries regulations or harvest controls will be put in place. It is a critical document that directly impacts every recreational fisherperson.

The current 2019/2020 Salmon IFMPs are quite lengthy documents, and are available at:  

Please contact DFO by email with any feedback as soon as possible. 

You may join a group discussion on January 6th via a webinar hosted by the West Coast Fishing Guide Association (WCFGA). It may provide you a more accessible platform to discuss our fishery issues, learn from others, and develop a consistent message to provide DFO as feedback.

Webinar details: 

ItemDescription
DateMonday, January 6, 2020
Time7 pm - 8:30 pm PST
TitleWCFGA Salmon IFMP Priorities Meeting
Link to join meeting from computer, smartphone or tablet.https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/848334325
Access Code
Access Code: 848-334-325
Audio only phone number+1 (647) 497-9391
Link to download GoToMeeting apphttps://global.gotomeeting.com/install/848334325

Port Renfrew’s salmon hatchery enters a new era

The Peninsula News Review website has an article describing changes regarding the salmon hatchery at Port Renfrew. In contrast to the constant bad news regarding the salmon fishery around Vancouver Island, this is an exceptional good news story!

The changes have seen the dissolution of the founding San Juan Salmon Enhancement Society and the establishment of the 4Mile Creek Enhancement Society, which has now taken over the operation.

“Over the past four months, the (old) society was phased out and a new society has taken over,” Shane Bruinsma, the manager of the hatchery, said.

Morris Tremblay has been running it since 1976, but at 87 years old, he’s decided it’s time to pass the operation on,” Bruinsma said.

“I’m now managing the site along with Lisa Margetish, and we’ve got some exciting things planned. We know that the community’s support is at the heart of our ability to move forward.”

Wild Salmon Advisory Council Hears from Kamloops

On January 8, the provincial government appointed Wild Salmon Advisory Council held a meeting in Kamloops to receive input from interested parties from the BC interior. Our thanks to Kamloops This Week, whose report on the meeting may be read in this article.

Matt Jennings, executive director of the B.C. Fishing Resorts and Outfitters Association, said that while recreational anglers are users of the resource, they are also a passionate group of stewards. He called for drastic measures from the government to show it is committed.

“The one thing I’m looking for from this government is an immediate stoppage of logging in critical salmon habitat,” he said. “If they can show us that they’ll actually do that, I think we’ll have a chance of moving forward.”


Travis Marr, a Tk’emlups member who works for the Stk’emlupsemc te Secwepemc Nation and fishes for both sustenance and sport, said he would like to see an end to “archaic discharge practices.”


“Here in Kamloops we have a sewer plant, Domtar and the city dump all within a small area, all downstream of the Thompson River, where there are juvenile-rearing salmon,” Marr said. “These archaic practices need to change. The City of Kamloops needs to smarten up and make those changes.”

March 1 deadline to respond to 2019 Fraser River Chinook Conservation Measures

DFO has distributed information that describes the actions DFO is proposing to take to address Fraser River chinook conservation concerns in 2019. They are seeking your feedback by March 1, 2019.

The table shown below, from DFO’s letter, summarizes the options they are proposing. You are strongly encouraged to provide them with your feedback.

Table 3: Summary Table of proposed management actions for Scenario A and B
FisheryScenario AScenario B
Commercial
NBC AABM (Area F) TrollClosed to July 17Closed to July 10
WCVI   AABM   (Area   G)
Troll
Closed to August 1Closed to August 1
Kamloops  Lake  Chinook Demonstration FisheryClosedClosed
Recreational
NBC AABMNo   measures   proposed   for   Fraser chinook No   measures   proposed   for   Fraser chinook
NBC ISBMNo   measures   proposed   for   Fraser chinookNo   measures   proposed   for   Fraser chinook
WCVI AABM (Areas 121
to 127)
a)   Apr 1 to July 31, Chinook non- retention;
b)   Aug 1 to Dec 31, 2 Chinook/day.
No   measures   proposed   for   Fraser chinook 
WCVI ISBMNo   measures   proposed   for   Fraser chinookNo   measures   proposed   for   Fraser chinook
Johnstone   Strait   (Area 12)c)    Apr 1 to July 31, Chinook non- retention;
d)   Aug 1 to Aug 29, 1 Chinook/day (with option for terminal fisheries);
e)   Aug 30 to Dec 31, 2 Chinook/day.
a)   Apr 1 to August 29, 1 Chinook/day (with option for terminal fisheries).
b)   Aug 30 to Dec 31, 2 Chinook/day.
 
Strait of Georgia – North
Areas   13   to   17,   28,
portion of 29 (29-1 and
29-2)
a)   Apr 1 to July 31, Chinook non- retention;
b)   Aug 1 to Aug 29, 1 Chinook/day (with option for terminal fisheries);
c)    Aug 30 to Dec 31, 2 Chinook/day.
d)   Apr 1 to August 29, 1 Chinook/day (with option for terminal fisheries).
e)   Aug 30 to Dec 31, 2 Chinook/day.
Strait of Georgia – South and
Juan de Fuca
Areas 18 to 20, portions
of Area 29 (29-3 to 29-5)
a)   Apr 1 to July 31, Chinook non- retention;
b)   Aug 1 to Aug 29, 1 Chinook/day (with option for terminal fisheries);
c)    Aug 30 to Dec 31, 2 Chinook/day.
a)   Apr 1 to July 31, 1 chinook/day; hatchery marked only
b)   Aug 1 to Aug 29, 1 Chinook/day (with option for terminal fisheries)
c)    Aug 30 to Dec 31, 2 Chinook/day.
Fraser River Tidal and Non Tidal and Sub area 29-6 to 29-10a)   Jan. 1 to August 23 , No fishing for salmon.  Aug. 23 to Dec. 31, Chinook non-retentiona)   Jan. 1 to August 23 , No fishing for salmon.
b)  Aug. Aug 23  to December 31, 1 Chinook/day
Freshwater          Regions 3,5,7 &8b)   closed to fishing for salmon except in some areas where fisheries on other stocks or species may take place.c)    closed to fishing for salmon except in some areas where fisheries on other stocks or species may take place.
First Nations
South Coasta)   Fishing to FSC communal allocations as in previous years; marine FSC Chinook fisheries are largely terminal and directed at local Chinook stocks.  No measures proposed for SCA First Nations chinook fisheries.A)   Fishing to FSC communal allocations as in previous years; marine FSC Chinook fisheries are largely terminal and directed at local Chinook stocks.  No measures proposed for SCA First Nations chinook fisheries.
Lower Frasera)   Jan. 1 to Aug 10, very limited impacts on chinook in FSC fisheries
b)  After Aug. 10, targeted chinook fishing or bycatch during sockeye- directed opportunities.
a)   Jan. 1 to Aug 10, limited chinook directed FSC fisheries with effort limitations extended to Aug. 10 or bycatch during sockeye- directed opportunities
b)  After Aug. 10, targeted chinook fishing or bycatch during sockeye-directed opportunities.
BC   Interior         d/s   of Thompson Confluencea)   Jan 1 to Aug 10, very limited impacts on chinook in communal FSC fisheries. Time or gear restrictions.
b)  After Aug. 10 limited selective chinook fishing or bycatch during sockeye-directed opportunities until.  Later in August, targeted chinook fishing or by-catch during sockeye directed fishing. Low impact terminal harvests.
a)   Jan 1 to Aug 10 limited communal FSC fisheries. Time or gear restrictions.
b)  After Aug 10, Directed chinook fishing or bycatch during sockeye-directed opportunities.
BC   Interior         u/s   of Thompson Confluence Note: the only chinook in the  area  are  Spring  52 and Summer 52 chinook.Fisheries in the area constrained by preferred gear type or fishing times. Discussion required to reduce overall catch.Fisheries in the area constrained by preferred gear type or fishing times.

2018 Salmon Catch Report

Via D.C. Reid, we are able to provide DFO’s 2018 post-season report on the salmon catch by the recreational, commercial and indigenous peoples fishing sectors. In Mr. Reid’s own words,

The table of most interest to Van Isle anglers is on page 93, cited as: 15.4 Appendix 4. It is the southern BC catch stats. I add the totals together to reach a total southern sport retained catch of 418,600.

Also of interest are the text write-ups for the specific stocks/rivers, which are earlier in the report and in the Table of Contents. Just click on an item, and the document jumps to it.

Thank you D.C. Reid and DFO.

Noise and Vessel Traffic

Our ACS President, Tom Cole, retired from the Royal Canadian Navy where he served as an underwater acoustics expert, has offered insights and advice to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson. You can read Tom’s letter here, for which he awaits a response.

…new regulations will do absolutely nothing to change the noise levels in these waters and will not change the inland waterway noise.

time that Government and DFO finally realize that the Orcas NEED to have Large Salmon to eat. To do this they need to close all salmon fishing in the Fraser river as that is where all the damage is being done to the brood stock that carries the Gene pool for these large Chinook.